Anxiety, Children, Parenting

Back to School

By Tonya Swartzendruber, MA

For many families, the fall represents a significant transition period. Returning to a school schedule can be daunting for kids and parents alike. Earlier bedtimes, packed morning routines, performance expectations, and more time away from parents are just a few changes kids face during the school year. A little planning can go a long way to help your family make this transition a smooth one.  Here are a few tips to consider:

Establish a school-like schedule gradually a week or two before the first day of school.

During the summer, many families relax bedtime, wake time, and meal schedules. Changing all of this at once on the first day of school can be a challenge. Try to gradually adjust sleep and wake times and bring more structure to the day 1-2 weeks before school starts. This can help the back-to-school transition feel more natural by the time Labor Day comes around.

 Address school-related anxieties with your child.

Even for kids that have already been in school for several years, the transition to a new grade can bring anxiety. Ask children about how they are feeling, listen carefully to any concerns they raise, and see if any can be addressed ahead of time. Normalize these concerns for your kids. Convey that transitions are hard for most people. At the same time, help them to refocus on what they are excited about in order to get into a positive space to face the challenges of school.

Involve kids in preparing for school.

This could be as simple as buying school supplies and new clothes together. The night before the first day of school, involve your kids in packing backpacks, lunches, choosing what to wear, and laying out their clothes. This will make the first morning of school much less hectic and stressful for everyone.

Convey excitement and confidence about this transition!

Kids are keen observers of their parents. They often take their cues from their parents to help them know how to feel about and prepare for new challenges. If you, as a parent are feeling anxious or uptight about any upcoming school challenges, find support and a place to talk about this with people other than your children. That way you can convey excitement and confidence about the new school year.

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