Four Strategies to Get Some Zzzzzzz’s


By Ariel Campbell

Most adults have experienced symptoms of insomnia at some point in their lives. In fact, according to the National Sleep Foundation between 30-50% of adults have occasional difficulties falling or staying asleep, waking up early, or waking up not feeling rested. Lack of adequate sleep can negatively influence our daily functioning by leading to impairments in attention and concentration, increased irritability, and overall poorer mental health. However, for those of us who suffer from occasional insomnia there are a number of healthy habits we can incorporate into our daily routines to improve our quality of sleep.

In order to understand how and why these habits can be useful in promoting restful sleep, knowing some basics about sleep is helpful. Our sleep is regulated by our body’s natural circadian rhythm. This circadian rhythm is responsible for our feelings of sleepiness and wakefulness throughout the day and is controlled by light and dark signals that occur naturally in our environments. For adults, sleep proceeds in a predictable pattern that involves 4-5 repetitions of a 90-minute sleep cycle, with each sleep cycle including 5 sleep stages. During sleep, a number of changes happen in our bodies – our heart rate and breathing slow down, our blood pressure and body temperature drop, our bodies produce and regulate a number of important hormones including those that impact growth and hunger, and our brains cycle through varying levels of activity.

Now onto some of the daily habits that can promote and improve sleep…

First, developing a bedtime routine can be an effective strategy for helping our minds and bodies transition into a state of relaxation after a busy day. Having a structured pre-sleep routine that includes a relaxing activity, like reading or listening to music, can promote sleep by helping us to form habits that actually function to cue sleep. Stimulating activities and screens, on the other hand, should be avoided during the 30-60 minutes before bedtime and as a general rule of thumb the only activities that should be carried out in bed are those related to sleep and intimacy. Additionally, an essential part of any good sleep routine involves keeping regular sleep and wake times, even over the weekend, insofar as this helps to maintain a consistent circadian rhythm.

Second, attending to certain factors within our sleeping environment can help to ensure high-quality sleep. Since light is a powerful cue for our body’s internal clock, keeping the bedroom as dark as possible while sleeping and dimming the lights one hour before bedtime are helpful sleep habits. If fully avoiding screens before bedtime isn’t possible, switching your cell phone or computer screen into nighttime mode is advisable because the blue light of daytime mode (as opposed to the red light of nighttime mode) will actually delay the release of melatonin making it harder to fall asleep. Keeping the bedroom temperature between 60-70 degrees while sleeping is another useful strategy that works by helping our bodies to maintain the drop in body temperature that accompanies sleep. And lastly, since our brains are still active and responsive during sleep a final consideration when it comes to structuring our sleeping environment is to limit noise as much as possible. Noise tends to be most disruptive during the first and second stages of sleep and during the second half of the night. Additionally “peak” sounds, for example busy street noises, are more damaging to sleep than ambient background sounds. If it’s difficult to eliminate noise while sleeping, white noise can help to reduce disruptions in sleep due to sound. Today, there are many apps for white noise but a fan or air conditioner that produces a consistent sound will also do the trick.

Third, certain exercise and dietary habits have also been shown to impact sleep. Aerobic exercise, like walking, swimming, or biking, can aid in sleep by increasing the amount of time our body spends in the deeper and most restorative stages of sleep. 20 minutes or more of daily aerobic exercise engaged in 4-5 hours before bed is recommended. While your morning coffee can help energize you for the day ahead, drinking a second cup of coffee during the afternoon or evening hours can disrupt sleep. Additionally, alcohol has been shown to cause impairments in sleep – although it may initially cause drowsiness and induce sleep, consuming alcohol before bed is associated with significantly more sleep disruptions during the second half of the night.

And finally, the timing, size, and content of meals can play a role in getting a good night’s sleep. For improved sleep, it is generally recommended that your largest meals be eaten earlier in the day and that snacks consumed before bedtime include complex carbohydrates and avoid sugar. Complex carbohydrates like whole-wheat breads, vegetables, fruit, and nuts break down slowly and help to prevent sudden spikes and crashes in blood sugar that can interfere with sleep.

While occasional symptoms of insomnia are common and not a significant cause for concern, they can nonetheless be disruptive to our daily routines. By using the above strategies for managing bedtime routines and environments as well as diet and exercise, you can develop healthy sleep habits that will promote a full night’s sleep and help you to wake up feeling rested and refreshed.

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I came to the Center for Anxiety for help in dealing with a family member who suffered from extreme anxiety. But I ended up getting a serious illness two months later and started having my own sessions. With the help of my therapist I got through my illness, learned to understand my habits that were making my major life stresses worse, learned to communicate better, taper my anger, and surprisingly I became more calmer even though my hardships in life worsened. Therapy is a lot of work and not easy, but nothing in life comes easy! I became a better and softer mom and (when I practice what I learned) and my kids and home are calmer and happier. I am still a work in progress and have more to work on, but I know I am on the right path. I wish I knew before how my communication style and anger were really impacting my life, how being softer you can accomplish way more then being harsh. I have been to other therapists in the past and I can hands down say that the Center for Anxiety’s approach is really effective. I have even referred a bunch of people to the Center and they have been really happy with the therapists and how much they really care for their patients.
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When I first came to the Center for Anxiety, my list of anxieties/fears was long! I was scared of getting sick, getting stranded, driving, flying and more. With the help of my therapist, I immediately got to work and tackled every one of my fears. Now the world is open to me and I feel free! I can dream big and accomplish whatever I set my mind to! I am especially grateful that I was able to do all this without having to rely on medication. It was hard work – grueling at times! – but now I have the coping tools within me for life. In fact a family member recently said to me “You are awesome. You can accomplish anything you set your mind to because you don’t let fear stop you! ” Thank you Dr. Rosmarin and the Center for Anxiety staff for helping me get here. My fears no longer limit me and I love my life. Try it, it might turn your life around too!
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When I sought treatment at the Center for Anxiety, the clinic was is in its incipient stages. However, by the time I successfully finished treatment, the Center for Anxiety grew and flourished into a world-class treatment center, offering cutting-edge, evidence-based treatment to countless individuals. The continued success of the Center for Anxiety comes as no surprise to me, with a team that contains such highly skilled professionals who display clinical acumen, empathy, and compassion. When I first entered treatment I was concerned that therapy would be similar to the experiences with past psychologists: a seemingly bottomless pit with no reductions in my anxiety symptoms, but was so relieved when I started to feel less anxious after only a handful of sessions. My therapist created a treatment plan that was tailored exactly to my needs and taught me practical skills to help me work through my anxiety that I still use and practice to this very day.
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When I first came in, I was struggling with panic disorder and didn’t even know it, which only made dealing with it that much more difficult. After my first time sitting down with my therapist, however, I instantly started to gain perspective and look at the difficult situation in a different light. Our meetings helped me conquer the issue step by step and get my life back on track. I’d strongly recommend that anyone dealing with anxiety in a way that impacts their day to day life should visit the Center for Anxiety! I know it helped me tremendously.
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When I woke up one morning last June and didn’t want to get out of bed, I knew I needed help. The thought of getting through another day with all my anxieties, obsessions and rituals was just too overwhelming. After feeling stuck for years, I just couldn’t anymore. Thankfully, that’s when I found the Center for Anxiety. Dr. Rosmarin and his staff are experts at what they do, kind and professional. After just several weeks I accomplished my initial targets. The change I experienced in such a short amount of time was astounding that I stayed on for a while longer to work on more complex goals. I soon achieved those too. Now, I am free of my obsessions, know how to manage my anxiety, and love my life. My only regret: not having done this sooner. I wish I had known that you don’t have to wait to hit rock bottom to get help.
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I’m 26 years old and I’ve been suffering from terrible depression for 7 years. In the throws of my sadness I literally wanted to die. Soon after starting therapy at the Center for Anxiety, my depression lifted. My suicidal thoughts began to dissipate. I remember the feeling that came over me as soon as the dark cloud above me left. It was the most liberating feeling I have ever experienced. I actually shouted to my friends, family and anyone nearby me “I’m Happy! I am Happy!” I felt free.
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