Center for Anxiety
News & Blog


Center for Anxiety
News & Blog

Bringing 2020 Home

Bringing 2020 Home

By Aliza Shapiro, LCSW The last few weeks of 2020 are officially upon us, and as we mark off the remaining calendar days we may notice ourselves starting to recount and reflect on what we’ve made of this completely unprecedented year. 2020 has not been what anyone...

read more
Adjusting to the “New Normal”

Adjusting to the “New Normal”

By Shoshana Levie, LCSW Over the last five months, it seemed as though a large majority of conversations began with: “When this is all over, I can’t wait to…” or “I just want to get back to…” Given the considerable upheaval that the global pandemic has caused, it is...

read more
COVID-19: From Anxiety to Sadness

COVID-19: From Anxiety to Sadness

By Becca Brodoff, PsyD Over the past few months, I’ve noticed a shift in myself and in my patients. When COVID-19 was first showing up in the U.S., anxiety was running high. Most people were overwhelmed by the uncertainty of the illness and how it would affect them...

read more
COVID-19 Anxiety

COVID-19 Anxiety

By David H. Rosmarin, PhD, ABPP Almost overnight, America’s anxiety level has gone through the roof. As media feeds overwhelm us with information that we repeatedly and compulsively check into the late hours of the night. Supermarkets are inundated with customers and...

read more
Bouncing Back from New Year’s Resolution Setbacks

Bouncing Back from New Year’s Resolution Setbacks

By Dovid Spinka, LMSW “I really should go to the gym this week… After all, I signed up for an annual membership in January and I’m paying a significant amount of money for it.”"I committed to reading every day for a half-hour, but I can count on one hand the number of...

read more
Three Strategies to Reduce and Resist Obsessions

Three Strategies to Reduce and Resist Obsessions

By Rachel Lacks, EdM Do you ever have an itching feeling that you just have to do something, or else the thought of doing it will haunt you? Do you ever feel the need to re-read a sentence in your book again, or to go back to re-read a whole paragraph, or a whole...

read more
Putting the Pieces Together When We Fall Apart

Putting the Pieces Together When We Fall Apart

By Anouk Allart, PhD "That's the way the mind works: The human brain is genetically disposed toward organization, yet if not tightly controlled, will link one imagerial fragment to another on the flimsiest of pretense and in the most freewheeling manner, as if it...

read more
Five Common Myths about Anxiety Dispelled

Five Common Myths about Anxiety Dispelled

By Becca Brodoff, PsyD. Panic attacks are dangerous. If you have ever experienced a panic attack, you know that the symptoms of panic are real and intense. Some people have a whole-body reaction, with physical changes like choking sensations, dizziness, sweating,...

read more
Test and Exam Anxiety

Test and Exam Anxiety

By Mark Staum, LCSW The months of October and November bring new weather patterns, new daylight schedules and new challenges for children. Exams, projects, and papers are back in full swing. Some children may experience some level of anxiety, in preparation for an...

read more
Back to School

Back to School

By Tonya Swartzendruber, MA For many families, the fall represents a significant transition period. Returning to a school schedule can be daunting for kids and parents alike. Earlier bedtimes, packed morning routines, performance expectations, and more time away from...

read more
Staying Cool in Summer Heat

Staying Cool in Summer Heat

By Yoni Sobin, PsyD In the winter, we face an increased risk of flu and seasonal depression, so we stay vigilant for contagions, stay warm, and keep engaged in activities with others (see my previous article on loneliness -...

read more
Holiday Self-Care

Holiday Self-Care

By Laura Vraney, PsyD While the Spring holiday season ushers in nicer weather and rays of optimism, there is no question that it also brings about anxiety. At times, we may become so distracted by the to-do list, both leading up to and during the holiday time that we...

read more
Mind’full’ Eating

Mind’full’ Eating

By Talia Kaplan, PsyD Mindfulness is the practice of living and being in the present. For people with anxiety, this is an especially important tool to use. It helps a person focus on what they are experiencing in the present moment rather than focus on everything that...

read more
Taking STEPS to Tackle Anxiety

Taking STEPS to Tackle Anxiety

By Zvi Weiss, PsyD Most research estimates that the average person makes around 35,000 decisions a day. What to eat, what to wear, whether to take this or that route to work, whether to say that thought or keep it to ourselves. Some of these we experience as active...

read more
The Complexity of Eating Disorders

The Complexity of Eating Disorders

By Laura Vraney, PsyD A common misunderstanding of eating disorders is that sufferers “just want to lose weight.” It’s true that the expectations of “appearance” have intensified over the years. From the abundance of unhealthy weight loss programs to the number of...

read more

Four Strategies to Get Some Zzzzzzz’s

By Ariel Campbell Most adults have experienced symptoms of insomnia at some point in their lives. In fact, according to the National Sleep Foundation between 30-50% of adults have occasional difficulties falling or staying asleep, waking up early, or waking up not...

read more

Making New Years Resolutions Work

Written by Ariel Campbell For many of us, entering into the New Year can bring about thoughts of change. It can be a time of retrospection when we reflect on our life choices and consider improvements we would like to make. It’s probably the case that most of us, at...

read more

It’s the Most Loneliest Time of the Year

Written by Yoni Sobin This time yearly, society blasts us with holiday music, jingles, lights, and festivities as individuals of all backgrounds celebrate holidays both secular and religious. We’re told this is a time for family, coming together, and celebration....

read more

Anxiety Disorders in Children: A Family Affair

Written by Regine Galanti When a child has anxiety, it often becomes a family rather than individual problem. While an adult with anxiety might suffer alone with racing thoughts of danger, or avoidance of anxiety provoking situations, children with anxiety are best...

read more

Decisions, Decisions…

Written by Thanos Nioplias Making decisions is a complex process that has been examined from various fields including cognitive psychology, neuroscience, and philosophy. Decision making is also very relevant to psychotherapy, since difficult dilemmas are a known...

read more

Validation Without Reassurance

Written by Hadar Naftalovich [Note: Details have been changed to protect patient privacy] When I started working at the Center for Anxiety, I quickly learned that some of the inquiries we receive are rather different from the typical phone calls I’d been used to. In...

read more

Overcoming Specific Phobias with Exposure Therapy

Written by Regine Galanti While most individuals display some anxiety when facing certain situations, such as spiders, insects, driving, heights, or closed spaces, among others, most of these fears are relatively benign and don’t affect an individual’s functioning....

read more

Staying Present in the Face of Anxiety

Written by Tonya Swartzendruber Most of us are familiar with the feeling of trying to escape from or avoid anxiety – we think that if we avoid a particular place/person/conversation our uncomfortable feeling will go away and never come back. But over time, those who...

read more

The Anxiety Bully

Written by Thanos Nioplias Every time a friend or a client shares that an anxiety attack got in the way of work, school, or a social activity, I can’t help but think of the story of a kid who is being bullied. Imagine you're a 5th grade kid in middle school. You love...

read more

Consistency: The Key to Discipline

Written by Regine Galanti Discipline. It’s a topic on every parent’s mind – what’s the best way to get my child to listen? To obey? To become a healthy adult with self-control? How does a parent raise these obedient, independent, self-disciplined children without...

read more

Using Awe to Get Through the Winter

Written by Hadar Naftalovich It can be hard to stay cheerful when one leaves for work before the sun is up, and gets home after it has already set. The lack of sunlight can certainly affect mood and the added stresses of the holiday preparations can make it seem like...

read more

Postpartum anxiety

Written by Debra Alper Ask any new mom to recall the first few weeks of motherhood, and her memories will likely be a mix of happiness and exhaustion, joy and tears. Much has been said about postpartum depression, and many moms know to expect that the early days after...

read more

What Overpriced Makeup Taught Me

Written by Sally Cohen Several months ago, I was hurrying down the streets of Manhattan together with a friend of mine. We were headed back to our dorm to settle down for the evening. It was getting late and we were tired (10 P.M. is way past everyone’s bedtime). On...

read more

Fall Beginnings

Written by Dovid Green With the recent Labor Day holiday as the unofficial closing of the summer season, we say goodbye to vacations, camp, and trips and welcome the fall season. And with that beautiful changing foliage comes the return to work and school. Though we...

read more

Encouraging Positive Behavior in Children

Written by Regine Galanti Picture this: You are playing Legos with your 6-year-old son, and he’s having trouble putting two pieces together. He begins to get frustrated, throws the pieces on the floor, and stomps, “this is the stupidest game EVER!” As a parent, what...

read more

The Lost Art of Learning from a Mentor

Written by Miri Korbman In an age where YouTube tutorials can turn “Average Joes” into experts overnight, learning is quickly becoming a lost art. Terms like “teacher” and “student” are being rendered superfluous to the culture of “self-made”, “self-taught”, and...

read more

The grass is always greener right over here!

Written by Debra Alper It’s a cliché, but so often it seems frustratingly true – Why is the grass always greener on someone else’s lawn?? Call it the envy of what others have, insecurity about one’s own standing, or as some have dubbed it “the grass is always greener...

read more

Let’s Talk About Selective Mutism

Written by Regine Galanti Child anxiety disorders tend to look a lot like their adult counterparts – children can experience Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Anxiety, Panic Disorder, and OCD in very similar ways to adults. This, however, is not always the case:...

read more

Life and Loss

Written by Molly Swanberg At some point in life we all face major losses. Whether it be the loss of a job, a friendship, or the death of a loved one, loss is a human inevitability. Although it is something we all experience, our reaction to loss can be very different....

read more

Feeling stuck: How to stop stressing about your stress

Written by Hadar Naftalovich At some points in life, everyone is bound to experience some form of stress. In a city like NY, it would be surprising if we did not experience feeling stressed at least once a day! This stress can take a toll on us, especially those...

read more

March Madness and Mental Health

Written by Eric Pollak March Madness is in full swing and for many Americans this means 3 weeks of NCAA college basketball, brackets, betting, and lost work time. According to the employment consulting firm Challenger, Gray, and Christmas, approximately 50 million...

read more

How to Spot Pseudoscience

Written by Debra Alper The term “pseudoscience” refers to practices that appear to be medically or scientifically related, but actually lack a basis in evidence. In other words – non-scientific products or theories dressed up as science. Indeed, our screens and news...

read more

The Power of Specific Attention

Written by Regine Galanti Many of the parents who walk into my office have a single complaint: They want their children to listen. They might be trying to help their child with problems at school, oppositional behavior, or even anxiety, but parents often articulate...

read more

Beat the Winter Blues

Written by Molly Swanberg It’s that time of year again. Winter has been long, and according to our famous groundhog friend we still have a significant stretch ahead of us. The days are short, and the relentless wrath of Mother Nature has all too often left us trapped...

read more

My New Year’s Resolution to Get More Sleep!

Written by Eric Pollak 2015 is upon us and our local gyms are filling up as people are beginning to fulfill their New Year’s resolutions. According to a University of Scranton study, losing weight, getting organized, and spending less/saving more were the top three...

read more

I touched a creepy, big, fuzzy, nasty, spider and . . .

Written by Hadar Naftalovich For as long as I can remember, I have been scared of spiders. Especially the big ones. In my head, tarantulas are really scary and very very venomous. They can sense fear. It was obvious to me, that if a tarantula ever landed on me, it...

read more

Anxiety and Public Transportation: A Spiritual Approach

Written by Miri Korbman Most New Yorkers are familiar with the predictable unpredictability of public transportation. As a frequent commuter myself, I have often experienced the aggravation of subway delays that then lead to missed trains, to missed classes, to snappy...

read more

Exerting Heroic Efforts

Written by David H. Rosmarin If you could sum up the ultimate goal – the end and be all – of Western civilization in one word, it would probably be “success”. Whether operationally defined by net worth, income, acquisitions, career advancement, community prowess,...

read more

Information overload!!

Written by Debra Alper It’s hard to pause at all these days, without someone or something competing for our attention. Whether it’s the ‘ding’ of new emails beckoning from our inbox, or calls from candidates vying for our vote, the information comes at a quick and...

read more

Parenting Your Anxious Child

Written by Regine Galanti As I've previously discussed here , worry is a normal part of life, and anxiety is quite common among children. As a parent, this scenario might sound familiar: Little Johnny is afraid of spiders. One day he is playing nicely in the park,...

read more

Conversations with Oneself

Written by David H. Rosmarin We may not admit it readily (at least not in public), but everyone does it. In fact, I speculate that it is impossible not to! I’m speaking about, well … speaking to oneself – i.e., having a conversation with no one else but your lonesome...

read more

Happiness at Work

Written by Hadar Naftalovich As many of us return from a (hopefully) pleasant summer, we arrive just in time for the usual hustle and bustle of the back to school period. Not only do children have increasingly busier schedules, but adults are also faced with heavier...

read more

Ignorance is Not Bliss

Written by Molly Swanberg If you are someone who watches the news regularly you will notice that there has been a lot of media chatter recently about the field of mental health. Usually it is something along the lines of “why do people get depressed?” or most recently...

read more

You Need A Vacation!

Written by Debra Alper We all know the type: the student who's up all night, reading and rewriting till the paper's just right. Or the employee who's in on the weekend when everyone else has long since gone home. Call it "type A" or just an incorrigible work ethic,...

read more

Talking to Children About Scary World News

Written by Regine Galanti There’s been a lot to worry about in the news lately: plane crashes, crises in Israel and in Ukraine, to name a few. During times of world crisis, it’s easy to assume that your children aren’t affected or don’t know what is going on. Many...

read more

Putting Things In Perspective

Written by David H. Rosmarin Last Thursday evening, as I was leaving the Center for Anxiety’s office on the 59th Floor of the Empire State Building, something strange happened: The elevator call button was not working. After several minutes, our reception area was...

read more

Graduation Anxiety

Written by Debra Alper With the weather getting warmer and the days growing longer, there is no doubt about it: Spring is in the air. For many students, in the coming weeks the chirping birds and blooming daffodils will be joined by another springtime mainstay – the...

read more

Exerting Heroic Efforts for our Dreams

Written by David H. Rosmarin One of the great tragedies of anxiety is that it can cripple a person's motivation and destroy one's dreams. Therefore, it is not surprising that exerting heroic efforts to achieve one's dreams can be an important strategy in the context...

read more

One Mindful Minute

Written by Molly Swanberg Mindfulness: It is a skill that most of us have heard of, but few of us truly use. For those of us who have not formally studied meditation, the concept of mindfulness may seem confusing or “too difficult.” In reality, however, being mindful...

read more

Developing Godly Visions of and for Ourselves

Written by David H. Rosmarin One of the great tragedies of living with anxiety is that it can destroy our vision for ourselves. By allowing anxiety to rule over one’s life decisions, great dreams and aspirations are cast aside in the face of worry and concern. If the...

read more

Workplace Stress

Written by Debra Alper Many of us pride ourselves on having a strong work ethic, seeking new challenges and opportunities at work and actively looking for ways to advance in our careers. However, if our physical and mental health begin to suffer, or our relationships...

read more

Does my Child Have OCD

Written by Regine Galanti In both adults and children, OCD is characterized by two core symptoms: (1) repetitive, distressing thoughts (obsessions), and (2) repetitive/difficult-to-resist behaviors aimed at getting rid of one's thoughts (compulsions). Similarly, for...

read more

The Danger of Idle Hands: Scheduling and Depression

Written by Molly Swanberg Have you ever noticed how time flies when you are busy? I mean truly busy. Have you noticed that during times of activity, you don’t have time to ruminate about how awful your last date went, or the fact that you feel you haven’t lived up to...

read more

Bring on Those Bad Thoughts

Almost all people occasionally experience thoughts that they don’t like. They may not admit it in public, but the fact of the matter is that almost everyone has some odd thoughts that they’d prefer not to have. While most people can just accept these thoughts and move on with life when they occur, some people adopt a “no negative thoughts allowed” policy…

read more

New Beginnings

Written by David H. Rosmarin It is well known that adjusting to life changes - whether social, occupational, familial, or otherwise - can lead many people to experience anxiety. Why is this the case? First, there is often a lot do. Adjusting to something new can...

read more

Financial Fears

Written by David H. Rosmarin Remember when you were young and used to be afraid of the dark? How did you get over your anxiety about that? Likely, it involved facing the dark. Guess what? That simple analogy is a key to dealing with anxiety. Learning to face one's...

read more

Speak with a Patient Care Manager

  • Date Format: MM slash DD slash YYYY

Our Locations